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April 12, 2003

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Comments

Philip

Ohmigod!

jadedju

I see why you felt the responsibility to print this, but, well, I'm not feeling too fond of Easter right now.

Toxiclabrat

Mix a Peep in them and ya really got a tastey treat!!

lee

that's just gross. Where's the chocolate? Easter is about the chocolate damn it.

Jim

Your Polish Easter soup is a little different than mine! Mine is a white borscht but no whey added! Email me if you want the real recipe!

Janina

There is also a version in which you boil a smoked or salted ham to remove some of the salt. Then boil the kielbasa. Take two tablespoons of flour and thin it with some of the stock from the pot. Add pepper to taste. Cook for several minutes till the broth is white and blended. Take ham chunks, kielbasa slices, sliced hardboiled eggs, farmers cheese, and the rye from the Easter table and add them all to the bowl you are using. Add broth and serve. We add horseradish for a kick, but it is optional. Sounds gross (looks gross if you ask my husband), but it is very filling and delicious!

John

Easter Soup at my house growing up consisted of a veal shank boiled with pickling spices, then the soup was skimmed thru cheesecloth - leaving a tasty broth to which was added some sour cream a bit at a time & a small bit of white vinegar. When served hot, we used to cut up kielbasa, ham & hard-boiled eggs. Yum. My Dad liked to add horseradish.

Barb

Has anyone ever used picle juice with half and half cream instead of buttermilk? Does anyone use a cheese crumbled in the soup?

Heather

yikes!

scott

Glad it sounds awful to you. I look forward to it every year, so there will be more for me.

scott

White Easter Soup has been part of my family's tradition forever. I am still making it as part of the Easter celebration. My dad's grandmother was from Poland. They would eat this soup after going to the early mass on Easter Sunday. It is incredibly filling and my family jokes that it is eaten once a year because it takes that long to digest. Old traditions die hard. The joy of a holiday is often in the remembering the loved ones we shared them with. My family's recipe matches Janina's except that sour cream is used as the thickening agent instead of the flour and we do not add farmer's cheese.

MB

Yes oh yes, white Easter soup. My grandmother also from Poland (now long deceased) however my mother and her 3 sisters all in their 80 still to this day make this version. We have used the term "Glop" as not one sister even know's the real name for this soup.

Agree very filling and hearty, love what my mother does with it, one hot horseradish or fresh grated and one regular of course "Gold's" horseradish.

Their version does not include the rye or oat nor the hard boiled eggs. The process uses milk, horsedish, whole egg (not cooked), then add the Kielbsa and Ham. It develops this slight curled effect and from we were told it was to remind us of the sour wine that was forced to Jesus on the Cross that he dined to remind us of his suffering.

Anyone out there that has that same story please add.

Angelena

I just came across this website and all the comments about Easter soup. I personally grew up loving easter soup. I still make it when I can...but the recipe handed down in my family is different than what I have seen so far on the internet. Our recipe consists of boiling fresh polish sausage with smoked polish sausage, smoked ham, smoked bacon, and smoked pork butt. You do this the night before Easter. You take the meats out, and put the broth somewhere cold so that the fat rises to the top. The next day, you remove the solid fats and discard. Then you reheat and add half and half and vinegar to the broth to taste. Then in a bowl you add a piece of each of the meats, hard boiled eggs from the Easter egg hunt, rye bread, fresh and prepared (jarred) horseradish. Then you spoon the broth over it. It's delicious!!! Where we live now, I have to smoke the meats myself as the stores here do not sell them. But it is my favorite holiday due to this soup and I look forward to it every year!!!

Glenn Harris

I just hit this page after looking up St. Patricks Day leftovers for cabbage soup.

I love to cook and try new things. However I thnk I will pass on Easter Soup this year. I will remember it and when I get brave enough maybe give it a whirl.

Kelsie

I actually love Easter soup. But my family's recipe is a bit different than the ones listed here. I'm not sure of the exact recipe but I do know it involved me doing a lot of egg peeling the night before. It is mainly kielbasa, ham, and eggs topped with farmer's cheese, horseradish, and/or extra eggs. When I was little I would pick out the meat and just eat the eggs, lol, but now I eat it all, though I still tend to pick around to get lots of eggs. It just wouldn't not be Easter without Easter soup.

The Greek Easter soup sounds disgusting, but then again I'm sure lots of people would find my family's Easter soup gross.

Chuck Ronevich

My mother made Easter soup every year and everyone loved it. Many of the relatives always came to visit just to get some Easter Soup.
My mother started out making the liquid which consisted of 1/2 of the water that was left over from boiling the ham. The other half of the liquid consisted of the whey from making cottage cheese. The rest of the ingredients were sliced keilbasi, pieces of ham, sliced boiled eggs, horseradish to suit, salt and pepper. If a bit more tartness was desired she would add a small amount of white vinegar.

My mother quit making the soup a few years before she died because she could no longer find any "whole, unpasteurized milk around anymore to make the cottage cheese/whey.

Some years later I decided to try doing a "makeover" of the recipe. I now make the liquid by starting out with chicken boullion and adding approximately the same amount of "non fat plain yogurt". The soup tastes exactly as mom made it. She would be proud of me!

Chuck 1/04/08

IonaTrailer

In my country we eat Easter soup all time. we take whatever meat is available, a cat or dog, a squirrel my father shoot, pig snout left over from butcher pig, or chicken part. Mix with onion and water, throw in nettles from near the outhouse, sometimes my sister get lucky and get some cabbage from factory. If meat no good, then throw in horseradish. Tastes better after glass or two of vodkla.

IonaTrailer

In my country we eat Easter soup all time. we take whatever meat is available, a cat or dog, a squirrel my father shoot, pig snout left over from butcher pig, or chicken part. Mix with onion and water, throw in nettles from near the outhouse, sometimes my sister get lucky and get some cabbage from factory. If meat no good, then throw in horseradish. Tastes better after glass or two of vodka.

IonaTrailer

In my country we eat Easter soup all time. we take whatever meat is available, a cat or dog, a squirrel my father shoot, pig snout left over from butcher pig, or chicken part. Mix with onion and water, throw in nettles from near the outhouse, sometimes my sister get lucky and get some cabbage from factory. If meat no good, then throw in horseradish. Tastes better after glass or two of vodka.

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